5 Things I Think of When I see A White Person.


As a Nigerian, I've always seen dark to medium toned complexioned people all my life. And that is because Nigerians are quite dark skinned and I have not being out of this continent Africa before. At least for now. So, I've had very rare sightings of white people in my country. And those few times I've turned back to get another full look at the foreigner once sighted.



So, I said we're very dark skinned in Nigeria and this is true. And I think this is due to the high concentration of melanin in our skin. And it's totally logical and reasonable of nature to give us that, since we are so close to the equator which means the sunlight intensity here in Nigeria is quite high. In fact, Nigeria is hot. Therefore, nature must have given us the necessary requirements in our skin to protect us. Hence, our overall dark skin tone.

So, what do I think of when I see a white person? I'll tell you. When I see a white person or any one with very light skin shade and especially wavy hair (No matter the continent you're from) a few things cross my mind;

1. I go WOW!



Like for real! I go Woooow!
    I mean, to me it's so rare to see those physical attributes. The almost white skin, the totally different hair from mine, it makes me almost go nuts. I'm like, Oh my God..

Most Nigerians pretend like they're not wowed when they see a White in Nigeria. But usually most of us are wowed. I'll say that on our behalf. We just like to hide it. *laughs

2. Can I feel your skin?

Yes, that also crosses my mind even if I never tell them that. I've met a significant number of whites in my life. I've met American, Japanese, Indian, Chinese, European, basically I've met someone from every continent. Even though I've never spoken with one.  Yes, I haven't. I haven't had a cause to. And moreover, foreigners are quite scarce in Nigeria. Because, they usually come here for business purposes.

But because White skinned and wavy haired people (and any type of hair that is completely different from a Nigerian's) are such a rare sight, it makes seeing one so fulfilling.

I bet if you give an average Nigerian an opportunity to hug you, if you're White, they wouldn't even think twice. They might even snap your back while hugging you. But don't worry, it's out of awe for you.

3. Can I touch your hair?

Even Nigerians who are quite used to seeing whites or spend a lot of time with them, still marvel at how different hair textures and types can be.

And usually Nigerians, not only me, would love to brush your hair for you if your hair type is completely different from ours. But, they might not let you know.

4. Speak let me hear you.

Don't get me wrong. Whites are not idolized in Nigeria. Not at all. I'm trying to point out that Nigerians are in awe, in constant awe of physical bodily attributes that are completely different from theirs. Especially skin color and hair type.

So, I usually linger around Whites to hear them talk. So I can have an idea of how they sound when they talk.

And, it's only normal to explore and check new things you're unfamiliar with.

5. Let's be friends!

Like usually I feel like I should have the phone contact of every foreigner I've met. Whether African or not. If you're Kenyan, let me have your number. Korean? The more different, the merrier!
This is so that we can talk. So I can get to understand them better. I feel like it's very cool. Lol.

If you're White and you're reading this, Yes, that's how most Nigerians feel about you guys. If you're African but not White, Nigerians will just like you because of your unique accent or something like that. Since we already have similar physical attributes right?

And if you're Nigerian and you acknowledge that we adore the White's physical bodily attributes ( but like to hide it), kindly say 'Yay!' in the comments!



Comments

  1. This is such an interesting perspective. I'm well traveled and I grew up in a very cultured neighborhood so I never really experienced this but I have some white friends that feel the same way when they see someone colored or oriental. It's nice to read this about a white person for a change lol

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    1. Lol... I just had to write this post. Since Nigerians act like they don't marvel when they see someone of another race.

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  2. Lol it did make me laugh at the thought at you touching someones hair. I grew up somewhere my skin colour was a little darker than many people as the majority were white -in skin tone. Even though I am caucausian, I have olive skin due to having Portuguese parents so people always thought I was not 'British'. London is a lot more multicultural than where I am from but if you go to Madeira where my family are from , they too get confused if they someone with dark skin. I have a black cousin and everyone thought it was strange even though it should be considered as perfectly normal.

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    1. Lol... Racial differences are indeed intriguing.

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  3. Your post was very interesting and I enjoyed the read. I'm from the United States where I see people who look different from me every day so it has become a normal thing for me. It is fun reading about a different perspective and experience.

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    1. Yes, fresh perspective is always it. Lol. Thanks!

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  4. So, I am not well-traveled but am always yearning to meet/learn about individuals from different countries, ethnic backgrounds, and cultures. I am just fascinated. Being a Caucasian individual and living in the US, I am surrounded by many of the same skin color. That made this post very interesting to me. To see it from the other way around. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. *smiles* You are very welcome Shawna.

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  5. Hahaha I found this interesting and funny. 3 & 5 are me too. I'm not white, I'm from South Korea. 3 happens to me when I see African American people, because guys hair looks so soft! haha. :) 5 happens for all people since I love getting to know people from different countries.

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    1. Claire, thanks. Glad to know you enjoyed reading this.

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  6. This is such a post offering such a different perspective. My husband and I live in a college town and therefore know people from all walks of life. Everyone we've met seem to have the same mindset as you "Let's be friends!" (although now I'll be wondering if they silently want to touch my hair) x

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    1. Maybe they want to Lol. But they don't know how you'll take it. Good to know you relate.

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  7. What a great post. I think if you met me you definitely wouldn't want to touch my hair. I hate it, being fair isn't all it's cracked up to be :)

    Louise x

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    1. Louise, your hair might not be that bad. Lol.

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  8. Errr! So not sure how I feel about this post, but Each to their own! I guess growing up in London I see all different types of races my whole life! My daughter is mixed and has he best of both worlds. I do find it odd when people want to touch another, I see no difference we all have blood inside us, just difference is blood type!

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    1. I know we all have blood in us. *smiles
      I didn't grow up among all the different races resulting in my fascination with races different from mine.

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  9. Nice post very well written but I don't agree with a few things . firstly I have never wanted to touch a white person , perhaps because I went to a primary school that had quite a number of white children. White people to me were my friends with different skin colour ...shikena. Secondly most Nigerians are dark skinned but your article gives the impression everyone is ebony dark which is cool except its inaccurate. Nigerians have all shades from very fair like my sister Uka to ebony black like my cousin Nenye. When written its important to let the reader know its your perspective not state it like that's just how things are with every Nigerian. Keep up the good work.

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    1. Amaka, maybe you skipped it but I stated in the opening of this article that Nigerians are dark to medium toned in complexion. But, issokay! Lol. I will take your correction and act on it. Thank you!

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  10. This made me laugh! I am mixed race with big curly hair and even now I get asked almost daily if people can touch my hair.

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    1. I didn't intend to be funny. At all! But I guess the more fun the better. Thanks.

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  11. This is very interesting, to be honest. To each her own I guess, but it is a different perspective from what we are used to. :)

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  12. I love this post! It's thought provoking for me because I've never considered what others might think in this situation! I did have a chuckle at the points where you say can I feel your skin and hair!

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  13. When i was young, I adored people with white skin so much, even envied them. But as I grow up, as I mature and as I learn more realities about life, I realized , they are just like us, humans. Now I find everyone beautiful, especially those with good hearts.

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    1. There really is nothing special. You are very right.

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  14. Your post makes a great read! I grow up in multi-cultural neighborhood, so I have seen all types of skin-colors and played with them as a kid!

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    1. Oh.. Then you can't find it intriguing anymore since you're so used to seeing different people right from childhood. Nice...

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  15. This is an interesting post. i like your take on this subject.

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